Stain Removal 101

Everyone at some moment in time has had a stain on his or her clothes. In most cases, the professionals at Reid’s can easily remove these stains. You can help us keep your clothes in top condition by identifying the location and nature of stains when you drop off your garments.

Stain removal is best accomplished when the stain is still fresh. Do not put anything away when it is stained or soiled.
 Most times, trying to remove the stain yourself could set the stain and prevent your dry cleaner from ever being able to remove it. It is generally better to let your dry cleaner do the work when:
• There are many stains or the stain covers a large area

• They require dry cleaning chemicals
• The fabric is fragile

• You are not sure what caused the stain
• You are unsure whether the garment is colorfast

Here are some other things to keep in mind when you are battling stains:

Stain Removal
Reid’s uses state-of-the-art processes and special stain removal chemicals to remove stains. Stains are divided into two major categories: solvent-soluble stains and water-soluble stains. Different stains require different treatments, which stain removal technicians are trained to administer. Why risk a disaster using an over-the-counter “all-purpose” stain removal product or trying a “home remedy” when you could rely on your drycleaner’s expert stain removal abilities?

Wetcleaning
Wetcleaning is a gentle form of cleaning that cleaners may choose to process sensitive textiles such as wool, silk, rayon, and linen. It gives dry cleaners more flexibility in processing items that may not withstand a drycleaning process or that have soils that would be better removed in water. For example, many items, such as wedding gowns, are often trimmed with plastic beads or sequins that may dissolve or discolor in drycleaning but generally perform well in wetcleaning. Items with large water-soluble stains are also more likely to come clean in a wetcleaning process.

Yellowing
Frequent cleaning removes stains that, if left untreated, could oxidize and cause yellowing. Exposure to heat or the passage of time can cause stains from food, beverages, and other oily substances to oxidize and turn yellow or brown, much the way a peeled apple turns brown after exposure to air. Once they become yellow or brown, these stains become much more difficult to remove and often cannot be removed.

Ink Stains
Hairspray and water can remove ballpoint ink, but you may be trading one problem for another. That’s because hairspray could contain alcohol and oils such as resins and lanolin. The alcohol in the hairspray can cause color damage especially on silk; likewise, oils and other ingredients could lead to additional stains.


Antiperspirant & Deodorant Stains
Many people do not realize that prolonged contact with deodorants and antiperspirants may cause permanent damage. Combined with the effects of perspiration, the damage can be extensive. The most frequent damage is caused by overuse of these products, or infrequent cleanings. This leads to the buildup of a stiff, caked-up
residue or to fabric damage.

To prevent chemical damage, do not overuse the product and allow it to dry before dressing. Wear dress shield with silk garments.

To remove the residue on washable garments, wash as soon as possible after wear in the hottest water safe for the fabric. Soaking in a detergent containing enzymes or an enzyme presoak may be necessary. If the stain remains, try using three percent hydrogen peroxide or chlorine bleach, according to fiber type or care label instructions. Before using, test for colorfastness.

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